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Data recovery and disk repair questions and discussions related to old-fashioned SATA, SAS, SCSI, IDE, MFM hard drives - any type of storage device that has moving parts
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Seagate ST31000528AS failure

February 7th, 2018, 5:04

hi guys,

I have Seagate ST31000528AS drive, it starts spinning, then a few clicking noises and then stop spinning..


I have opened the drive and made a photo.. as you can see, some problems on the plate I would say..


fortunatelly, I have another one, which Works good - my idea is to switch plates from bad to the one which Works - will it work or based on the picure, there is some problem in FAT (possibly firmware) area and there is no chance to read data?


btw. I have already tried to switch logic board, but the same behaviour so it is not in the logic board (I think, I'm not an expert)


data are sensitive so no posibility to send HDD to external company for recovery..

and yes, from the HDD failure, I'm using RAID and also net/local backup but that disk is from older times, maybe somebody can give me a good advice..


thank you so far!
Attachments
IMG_20180206_144625.jpg
HDD plate

Re: Seagate ST31000528AS failure

February 7th, 2018, 9:04

Your drive is FUBAR, nothing you can do to recover from it, media is damage. You mention that drive is part of a RAID? what level RAID is that?

Re: Seagate ST31000528AS failure

February 7th, 2018, 10:21

Too late for something, both from the defect and from the opening of the drive.

A pro could recover some of the data, but I believe it would be costly. You need to balance the data importance for this cost, and then choose a data recovery company with a good confidentiality agreement. I´m sure there are many in Europe.

Re: Seagate ST31000528AS failure

February 7th, 2018, 10:36

Looks like you killed a dead disk. Yep not much to do except to rebuild the array on a working Hdd.

Re: Seagate ST31000528AS failure

February 7th, 2018, 11:05

hi all,

no no no.. that disk is not part of any raid.. I was just saying that from that failure, I'm using raid.


so there is no way how to read data betweet those damaged areas? like sector by sector?? it should work right..?

if I take out disks from failured HDD and put them into working one (the same model) - no possibility to recover something?

Re: Seagate ST31000528AS failure

February 7th, 2018, 11:14

I know I will sound harsh, but just stating the facts :

The way to recover the little data that still is possible would involve many heads, because they will be damaged by those rings in the platters and other damage to the surface.

Yes, it is possible to read some data between those damaged areas. Some very experienced people can do it. It will cost a lot, also.

If YOU take the disks from this disk and put in another ( what for ? The problem is in the disks ) you will just ruin the good disk, and destroy any possibility of recovering your data.

To sum it up : if the data is important, find a professional recovery firm ( if you complete your profile in the site with Country/City people may advise someone near you ) . It will not be cheap, and many people will refuse the job, now that the disk has been opened without necessary precautions .

If data is not that important to justify paying for it, then just put the disk in the trash, and consider this a costly lesson on keeping backups.

Re: Seagate ST31000528AS failure

February 7th, 2018, 11:27

fofapple wrote:I have Seagate ST31000528AS drive, it starts spinning, then a few clicking noises and then stop spinning..

I have opened the drive and made a photo.. as you can see, some problems on the plate I would say..

fortunatelly, I have another one, which Works good - my idea is to switch plates from bad to the one which Works
This is a good guide on how to make two dead drives out of a dead drive and a working one.

Since you have already opened the drive (which was a very bad idea on its own), look at the air filter - how dirty it is? This could give you a rough idea about chances with a professional DR company.
But recovery will be time consuming, expensive and far from 100% perfect anyway.


fofapple wrote:data are sensitive so no posibility to send HDD to external company for recovery...
I'm using RAID and also net/local backup but that disk is from older times, maybe somebody can give me a good advice..
The best advice here would be a RAID recovery (but that also depends on the RAID level).

If necessary, we can offer remote RAID recovery, which will be done at your place, so no data will be transferred anywhere.

Re: Seagate ST31000528AS failure

February 7th, 2018, 11:30

disk is NOT from raid - I only told you that I'm NOW using raid because I want to be secure :)

ok and, it will be maybe very amateur point of view BUT:

what about reading those good data like from vinyl? like rotating the plate and moving the reading head and saving those ones and zeros and basically collecting what was left..?

or this reading head in bad hdd is already bad because of the plate surface?


btw the other disk was opened too - just to see how good plate should looks like but it's ok, it's 8 years old 1TB disk.. nobody would use it for any purpose...

Re: Seagate ST31000528AS failure

February 7th, 2018, 11:35

fofapple wrote:what about reading those good data like from vinyl? like rotating the plate and moving the reading head and saving those ones and zeros and basically collecting what was left..?

Awesome!
One of the most revolutionary approaches I've seen in the data recovery industry so far.

Be sure to additionally lubricate the platters to help the sliders move easier.

Re: Seagate ST31000528AS failure

February 7th, 2018, 11:44

Awesome!
One of the most revolutionary approaches I've seen in the data recovery industry so far.


:)) it's the standard approach but it should work.. head will read right? so if you move above the rotating plate, you must get data.. and every sector has humber and other info so some software should be able to "build" iso image from those data...

Re: Seagate ST31000528AS failure

February 7th, 2018, 12:21

fofapple wrote:what about reading those good data like from vinyl? like rotating the plate and moving the reading head and saving those ones and zeros and basically collecting what was left..?

or this reading head in bad hdd is already bad because of the plate surface?


btw the other disk was opened too - just to see how good plate should looks like but it's ok, it's 8 years old 1TB disk.. nobody would use it for any purpose...



As I told you, reading what is left will involve many head changes, because the platter surface will damage then. That is one of the reasons it will be costly to recover just a part of the disk.

The other disk is destroyed now also. There was no reason to open it, but if nobody would use it, then now it can to go trash and cease being a waste of space.

As for your problem disk, you should consider its data lost. Think as if it was stolen, complain a little, then forget about it and seek ways to rebuild the data, if possible. Recovery from the situation the disk is in is not viable in this case.

Re: Seagate ST31000528AS failure

February 10th, 2018, 15:30

Too bad you will not be able to recover the porn that was stored on that disk ever again ....

Is this thread a joke, right ?

Data is on the platter. If you move bad platter to good disk you will be moving the damaged platter with data to the good drive. If you place a new platter on the damaged drive you will not move the data on the bad platter.

And you can't read the bad platter like you described. Forget it.

You need to access Firmware on platter to calculate translator as even if you were able to read that platter you would still have to account for the defects on the P-List. Then you might have multiple heads (platter with 2 heads), then you will kill heads because of platter damage, then this and that .... and by the time we finish to write about all the problems you will encounter and why this is not possibile to recover you are better off getting new porn instead of recovering the one on that drive lololol

:mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:
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